Archive for artificial insemination

My Experience Undergoing A Water Ultrasound

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The next step in pursuing artificial insemination on the path to adding to my family was a water ultrasound. For those who don’t know, it involves a speculum, a catheter to place the water, and an ultrasound wand. Good times!

So the speculum is the hardest for me. Even the smallest size is difficult because it forces muscles to move that don’t want to move. The reproductive endocrinologist was kind enough to remove the speculum as soon as she just barely got the catheter in place.

Water is pushed in through the catheter to stretch the uterus open kind of like a blown-up balloon. Thereimage018 is some cramping involved when enough water is pushed in, but it’s supposedly not as bad as cramps caused by the HSG (hysterosalpingogram). I don’t remember cramping with the HSG due to how much medication I had to be on to tolerate it though.

The ultrasound wand was a little difficult, but soon just felt weird most of the time. It was uncomfortable only a couple of times when the viewing angle had to be more extreme.

Good news! No polyps or anything else that might interfere with implantation, plus I had a nice fat follicle developing on the left ovary. It measured 17 mm. I was pretty sure there was one on that side because I had started feeling sore in that area. Apparently, the ovary itself can feel sore when other organs rub against it while it has the growing follicle.

It just felt weird when the ultrasound wand and catheter were removed.

I did not actually have any tears come out of my eyes during the procedure so I think it was a success. I was complaining after the procedure about how much of a wuss I am when the doctor said she thought I did really well, was proud of me, and that she didn’t think I gave myself enough credit. I felt really good hearing someone say they were proud of me. That’s been really rare in my life. Based on her comments (and she should know because she does this stuff all the time), I decided to try to feel proud of myself. Go, me!

My next steps are picking a donor and meeting with the RE or her nurse practitioner to go over the schedule for next cycle. It’s getting real, people!